History

History: Curriculum Intent

 

At The Holy Spirit, we want our chidlren to gain a coherent understanding of past and present events in British and World History. We aim to develop children's critical thinking and enquiry skills, using sources of evidence to help them form an inteligent point of view on relevant topics. Chidlren should gain an understanding of how people's lives have changed throughout the years and become aware of the impact certain historical events have made on our lives today.

Our Curriculum Drivers:

 

Spirituality: As a Catholic School we are driven by a spiritually rich curriculum that holds Gospel values at its heart, encompassing the importance of British values and Equality.

Possibilities: A curriculum that provides quality experiences, encouraging our children to have high aspiration for their future and to be aware of all the opportunities available to them.

Resilience: Our curriculum encourages children to learn how to think well, it seeks to remove barriers to learning through growth mind-set, developing problem-solving skills and bounce-back ability.

Characteristics of a Historian

 

• An excellent knowledge and understanding of people, events, and contexts from a range of historical periods and of historical concepts and processes.

• The ability to think critically about history and communicate ideas very confidently in styles appropriate to a range of audiences.

• The ability to consistently support, evaluate and challenge their own and others’ views using detailed, appropriate and accurate historical evidence derived from a 

range of sources.

• The ability to think, reflect, debate, discuss and evaluate the past, formulating and refining questions and lines of enquiry. 

• A passion for history and an enthusiastic engagement in learning, which develops their sense of curiosity about the past and their understanding of how and why 

people interpret the past in different ways. 

• A respect for historical evidence and the ability to make robust and critical use of it to support their explanations and judgments.

• A desire to embrace challenging activities, including opportunities to undertake high-quality research across a range of history topics.

Implementation
 
Our pupils should be able to organise their knowledge, skills and understanding around the following learning concepts:

Investigate and interpret the past

This concept involves understanding that our understanding of the past comes from an interpretation of the available evidence.

Build an overview of world history

This concept involves an appreciation of the characteristic features of the past and an understanding that life is different for different sections of society.

Understand chronology

This concept involves an understanding of how to chart the passing of time and how some aspects of history studied were happening at similar times in different places.

Communicate historically

This concept involves using historical vocabulary and techniques to convey information about the past.

 

These key concepts or as we like to explain them to children – learning hooks, underpin learning in each milestone. This enables pupils to reinforce and build upon prior learning, make connections and develop subject specific language. 

The vertical accumulation of knowledge and skills from Years 1 to 6 is mapped as follows:

Milestone 1 - Year 1 & Year 2 Milestone 2 - Year 3 and Year 4 Milestone 3 - Year 5 & Year 6

Investigate and interpret the past

This concept involves understanding that our understanding of the past comes from an interpretation of the available evidence.

• Observe or handle evidence to ask

questions and find answers to

questions about the past.

• Ask questions such as: What was it

like for people? What happened?

How long ago?

• Use artefacts, pictures, stories,

online sources and databases to

find out about the past.

• Identify some of the different ways

the past has been represented.

• Use evidence to ask questions and

find answers to questions about the

past.

• Suggest suitable sources of

evidence for historical enquiries.

• Use more than one source of

evidence for historical enquiry in

order to gain a more

accurate understanding of history.

• Describe different accounts of a

historical event, explaining some of

the reasons why the accounts may

differ.

• Suggest causes and

consequences of some of the main

events and changes in history.

• Use sources of evidence to deduce

information about the past.

• Select suitable sources of

evidence, giving reasons for

choices.

• Use sources of information to form

testable hypotheses about the past.

• Seek out and analyse a wide range

of evidence in order to justify claims

about the past.

• Show an awareness of the concept

of propaganda and how historians

must understand the social context

of evidence studied.

• Understand that no single source

of evidence gives the full answer to

questions about the past.

• Refine lines of enquiry as

appropriate.

Build an overview of world history

This concept involves an appreciation of the characteristic features of the past and an understanding that life is different for different sectio

• Describe historical events.

• Describe significant people from

the past.

• Recognise that there are reasons

why people in the past acted as they

did.

• Describe changes that have

happened in the locality of the

school throughout history.

• Give a broad overview of life in

Britain from ancient until medieval

times.

• Compare some of the times

studied with those of other areas of

interest around the world.

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural

or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic

features of the past, including ideas,

beliefs, attitudes and experiences of

men, women and children.

• Identify continuity and change in

the history of the locality of the

school.

• Give a broad overview of life in

Britain from medieval until the Tudor

and Stuarts times.

• Compare some of the times

studied with those of the other areas

of interest around the world. 

• Describe the social, ethnic, cultural

or religious diversity of past society.

• Describe the characteristic

features of the past, including ideas,

beliefs, attitudes and experiences of

men, women and children.

Understand chronology

This concept involves an understanding of how to chart the passing of time and how some aspects of history studied were happening at similar times in differe

• Place events and artefacts in order

on a time line.

• Label time lines with words or

phrases such as: past, present,

older and newer.

• Recount changes that have

occurred in their own lives.

• Use dates where appropriate.

• Place events, artefacts and

historical figures on a time line using

dates.

• Understand the concept of change

over time, representing this, along

with evidence, on a time line.

• Use dates and terms to describe

events.

• Describe the main changes in a

period of history (using terms such

as: social, religious,

political, technological and cultural).

• Identify periods of rapid change in

history and contrast them with times

of relatively little change.

• Understand the concepts of

continuity and change over time,

representing them, along

with evidence, on a time line.

• Use dates and terms accurately in

describing events.

Communicate historically

This concept involves using historical vocabulary and techniques to convey information about the past.

• Use words and phrases such as:

a long

time ago, recently, when my

parents/carers were children,

years,

decades and centuries to describe

the

passing of time.

• Show an understanding of the

concept

of nation and a nation’s history.

• Show an understanding of

concepts

such as civilisation, monarchy,

parliament, democracy, and war

and peace.

• Use appropriate historical

vocabulary to communicate,

including: 

• dates 

• time period 

• era 

• change 

• chronology.

• Use literacy, numeracy and

computing skills to a good standard

in order to communicate information

about the past.

• Use appropriate historical

vocabulary to communicate, including: 

• dates 

• time period 

• era 

• chronology 

• continuity 

• change 

• century 

• decade 

• legacy.

• Use literacy, numeracy and

computing skills to a exceptional

standard in order to

communicate information about the

past.

• Use original ways to present

information and ideas.

 

Aspirations for the future

 
Pupils develop an understanding of how subjects and specific skills are linked to future jobs. 
Here are some of the jobs you could aspire to do in the future as a Historian:
  • Member of Parliament
  • Curator
  • Publicity Assistant
  • Tour Guide

For more careers, please visit First Careers.

Impact

Assessment

 

Through the explicit teaching of the History skills, both the teachers and the pupils assess their learning continuously throughout the lesson. At the end of the unit, and whenever possible throughout the year, pupils reflect on their knowledge and understanding of the concepts, to ensure that knowledge is stored in thier long-term memory, enabling them to recall information and opinion away from the time of teaching. Our assessment system, based on Milestones 1 to 3, helps teachers to make informed judgements about the depth of their learning and the progress they have made over time.